Perception of Disfigured Faces

Written by the School of Psychology, Copyright 2016.


The Principal Investigator(s)

Madison Clement: M.Clement@uel.ac.uk

Introduction

The interest of this research is to look at how different faces are perceived. You will be asked to complete a task followed by a short questionnaire. The task will involve looking at faces and you will be asked to make a simple decision. There are no hazards or risk in participating in this study. The images used in this study might be unusual to some participants. The names of organizations and charities working in this field will be provided if necessary at the time of debrief.

Confidentiality of the Data

You will be asked to input a memorable word in case you wish to withdraw your data. You will not be asked to give your name or any other identifying information, only your age and gender and ethnicity. Since there are three researchers working on this project, all three will have access to the anonymous data. You will have an opportunity to withdraw your data for up to 7 days after data collection. The data will be kept for 10 years from the date of publication of any article arising from this research, however your personal information will never be used or published.

The study will be carried out online.

Disclaimer

You are not obliged to take part in this study and should not feel coerced. You are free to withdraw for up to 7 days after the data collection. Should you choose to withdraw from the study you may do so without disadvantage to yourself and without any obligation to give a reason.

If you have any questions or concerns about how the study has been conducted, please contact the study’s supervisor:
Anna Stone
School of Psychology, University of East London, Water Lane, London E15 4LZ.
Tel: 020 8223 4452
Email: a.stone@uel.ac.uk

or

Chair of the School of Psychology Research Ethics Sub-committee
Dr. Mark Finn
School of Psychology, University of East London, Water Lane, London E15 4LZ.
Tel: 020 8223 4493
Email: m.finn@uel.ac.uk

About you

Please answer the following questions...

How old are you?
Are you male or female?
What is your ethnicity?
Please enter a memorable word so that you can identify your data if necessary:

Instructions

In this task you will see a picture of a face followed by a different picture of the same face. Then you will see one of these pictures again and you will be asked to decide whether it was the first or the second picture. At the end you will be asked to complete a short questionnaire.

Before you begin the actual task you will have a few practice trials. If you think the third face was the same as the first face please press Z, and if you think the third face was the same as the second face please press M. Please rest a finger lightly on the Z key and the M key.

When you are ready to start, please press either key.

+

Z = First face, M = Second face


Instructions

That was the end of practice. Now the main task will begin. This will take around 8 minutes. Please rest your fingers lightly on the Z and M keys, and press either key to start the task.

+

Z = First face, M = Second face


Please read each statement and think how often it is true for you.

Statement Never Rarely Sometimes Often Always
I avoid disgusting things.
When I feel disgusted, I worry that I might pass out.
It scares me when I feel nauseous.
I feel repulsed.
Disgusting things make my stomach turn.
I screw up my face in disgust.
When I notice that I feel nauseous, I worry about vomiting.

Please read each statement and think how often it is true for you.

Statement Never Rarely Sometimes Often Always
I experience disgust.
It scares me when I feel faint.
I find something disgusting.
It embarrasses me when I feel disgusted.
I think feeling disgust is bad for me.

Saving data

Please wait...

Debrief - Page 1/2

This study seeks to investigate whether we have a separate category of disfigured faces as distinct from non-disfigured faces. We generally use categories to simplify our decision processes and guide our reactions to events and people. Categorisation processes have been found for facial emotions, and facial identities, but not previously for facial disfigurement. The current study therefore intends to investigate the possible contribution of perceptual categorisation to stereotyping of people with facial disfigurement.

If you would like to withdraw your data from the study please contact the researchers with your memorable word within 7 days of your date of participation.

If you have any further questions regarding the study or any queries about your data please feel free to contact any of the following:

Madison Clement: M.Clement@uel.ac.uk
Supervisor: Anna Stone: A.stone@uel.ac.uk

Once again, thank you for kindly taking part.

Debrief - Page 2/2

Please see charities and information regarding people with disfigurements

www.changingfaces.org.uk

www.facingtheworld.net

www.savingfaces.co.uk

www.lets-face-it.org.uk

www.nhs.uk/Livewell/facialdisfigurement/Pages/SupportGroups.aspx

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